Halloween Pet Safety Tips

blackcatpumpkin

  1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. If you do suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call us immediately or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.
  2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them.
  3. Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.
  4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.
  5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause undue stress.
  6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go “au natural” or donning a festive bandana.
  7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.
  8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.
  9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside.
  10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increasing the chances that he or she will be returned to you!

Download the New, Free ASPCA Harmful Substances App!

We wanted to share with all of you that the ASPCA has just launched a very useful free app for smartphones and tablets which quickly and easily allows you to gather critical information on substances that may be harmful to your pet(s) based off their species!

With just a few swipes, you can:

  • Lookup, by species, substances of all sorts to determine if they may or may not be harmful to your pet(s).
  • Easily select which item you are searching for in based on their quick selection menu.
  • Gain access to colorful images for easy identification, level of toxicity, side effects, and actions to take for each item listed.
  • Complete access to their “chocolate wheel” and “rodentislide”, quickly helping you determine the level of severity for your pet if these substances are consumed.
  • Quickly contact the ASPCA 24/7/365 hotline number, with full access to their specially trained staff and toxicologists in a click of a button.

Below are some screen shots of this new free app which is available for download:

smartphone screenshots

To download the app based on your device- click on either one of these links:

DOWNLOAD NOW

Downloadicon-Apple

Downloadicon-Android


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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It’s Going to Be a HOT & HUMID Day in Pekin Today- Keep Your Pets at Home and Please Share This with Friends & Family

dogsleftincar

Today, the temperatures in Pekin and the surrounding areas are supposed to hit the low 90’s.  Bella, Dotty, Jake, and Snickers…sure, they’re fairly common pet names, but they’re also the names of just a few of the pets that died last year because they were left in cars on warm (and not necessarily hot) days while their owners were shopping, visiting friends or family, or running errands. What’s so tragic is that these beloved pets were simply the victims of bad judgment.

Want numbers? An independent study1 showed that the interior temperature of vehicles parked in outside temperatures ranging from 72 to 96° F rose steadily as time increased. And cracking the windows doesn’t help….

Temp in Cars Table

…add to that the fact that most pets are not properly restrained while in the car, and you’ve got some dangerous situations – for people and pets alike. Unrestrained pets can be seriously or fatally injured, or could even hurt you, in a collision or sudden braking situation. In addition, they’re a distraction for the driver, which increases the risk of driver errors. According to a 2010 American Automobile Association (AAA) survey, 2 out of 3 owners engage in distracting behaviors (playing with, feeding or petting their dog, or letting their dog sit in their lap) when pets are in the car…and according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), approximately 20% of injury crashes involve distracted driving.

Please don’t become another statistic: only take your pets in the vehicle with you when you absolutely need to, and always properly restrain your pets while in the vehicle.

How can you help prevent these injuries and deaths?

  • Learn more about keeping your pet safe during travel;
  • Set a good example by leaving your pet(s) at home except when you need to have them in the vehicle;
  • Set a good example by always properly restraining your own pet(s) while in a vehicle;
  • Educate clients, family and friends about these issues and how they can keep their pet(s) safe;
  • SHARE THIS POST!

Here is a video of a well known Veterinarian, Dr. Ernie Ward, who locked himself in his car armed with a thermometer to see what it feels like for an animal in the same scary situation. With him, he brought a clock and a video camera and narrated his experience as the time ticked and the mercury level rose.

https://youtu.be/JbOcCQ-y3OY


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Looking After Your Pets During Fireworks

CatHiding

Eighty percent of pet owners have owned a pet afraid of fireworks. Do you constantly worry about your pets during firework displays close to your home? Do you fear you may come home to find that your pets are unhappy or, even worse, ill because of the extremely loud noises? If you can’t ask for quieter fireworks, you will have to do the best you can to comfort your pet. Here are the ways our veterinarians at Lange Animal Clinic recommend to keep your pet safe and cared for during fireworks.

  1. Know when fireworks will be happening and how they’ll impact your home. Contact your local municipality to find out when your area is likely to have fireworks. Mark the dates on a calendar so that you can keep track of when to ensure your pets are cared for. If you know or suspect that the fireworks will be heard at your house, take the precautions outlined in the following steps.
  • Check that your pets’ ID tags and microchips are in date; mark the calendar when renewal payments are due and be sure to make the payments. If your pet does go running off during fireworks events, it’s much easier to be able to identify its ownership with these features.
  • Fireworks upset pets as a result of the noise, smell of sulfur, and flashing lights.
  1. Prepare your dog for dealing with noise by exposing your pet to other sounds. Desensitization of noises helps to prevent a phobia of loud noises. Play a cd at a volume suitable that has noises or find ways to make different noises well before the firework season, or after the event.
  1. Prepare the house. The house becomes your pets’ safety zone, so it’s important to prepare it properly.
  • Keep some lights on. Keeping a light on will calm your pet and make him feel more secure, rather than being scared in a dark room.
  • Dampen the noise. Close the curtains in the room and, if your animal is a caged one, cover up the cage in a thick blanket, but make sure it is breathable so your animal doesn’t suffocate. This will also help to stop the flashes of light affecting your pet.
  • Plan to use familiar sounds to drown out the noise of the fireworks. Music from a stereo or turning on the TV are likely familiar sounds that can sooth your pet. Just make sure not to play these sounds ridiculously loud as they can become bothersome themselves.
  1. Prepare the room. Select a suitable room where you will contain the pets for the duration of the fireworks. An inner room that is least impacted by the noise is ideal. It should be a room that you can close off to prevent your pet from running about the house and injuring itself, wrecking furniture, etc. If you have more than one pet, be sure they don’t mind being confined in the same room, or select several rooms for different pets. For example, dogs and cats will usually appreciate being kept separate.
  • Make the room cozy. Put down familiar, clean bedding somewhere pleasant such as under a table, on or behind a chair, etc. Add some familiar chew toys, scratch pads, balls, etc., to keep your pets amused and distracted.
  • Ensure that the room temperature is pleasant; warm if it’s cold weather, or cool if it’s hot weather.
  • Consider whether sound might be soothing. If your pet is used to music, turn some on at normal volume. Also, the sound of rainwater is very soothing to pets.
  • Use lavender. This is optional, but you might like to use lavender scented items to help calm your pet. Use a spray or gently bruise the leaves and flowers of some fresh plants. Just make sure that it’s out of reach of your pet. Using heated scent oils or incense is not recommended as a frantic pet can knock them over and start a fire or injure themselves.
  • Add a litter tray for cats.
  • Remove any sharp items from the room in case your pet starts jumping or running around.
  1. Prepare yourself. In the desire to ease our pet’s pain, sometimes we can transfer some of our anxiety and upset to the pet. If you’ve prepared properly in advance, there is no need to feel upset and worried as you can be reassured about the safety of your pet.
  • Realize that the startled and frantic reactions of your pet are often the principal source of your own upset. Being ready for their reactions can help to keep you calm as well.
  1. Confine your pet. Half an hour to an hour before the fireworks are due to be set off, place your pet into the chosen room. If you’re concerned about not being able to locate your pet (for example, cats aren’t always easy to find), consider finding your pet several hours earlier. Mealtime is a good time to round up every pet, provided it falls before the fireworks are set off. If your dog needs a walk, be sure to walk her before confining her.
  • Even if your pet is caged, place it into the secure and comfortable room you’ve selected.
  1. Provide food and hydration. Be sure to leave sufficient water and food for your pet in the confinement space. Many pets will be uneasy, or even frantic. If your pet has access to water, it will help calm him, and food supplied in your pet’s regular portion will make him feel like it’s a normal day.
  1. Keep an eye on your pet, and if possible, stay with her. Comfort her and talk to her. Be friendly but don’t fuss over her too much; this can increase her anxiety if she picks up on yours and can reward and encourage fearful behavior. If it’s not possible to stay with her, (perhaps because you’re out or busy (you may be at the firework display), don’t worry – the previous steps should ensure that your pet has been adequately cared for.
  • Allow your pet to hide somewhere in the room if wished. It’s your pet’s way of coping (a “bolthole”) and dragging them out of a safe spot can increase their anxiety levels. Don’t fuss over her too much.
  1. Check on your pet after the fireworks. Reassure him and remove the protection (blankets, etc.) as long as you’re sure that the loud fireworks are over. Let him have free run of the house to see how he behaves before considering letting him return outside (it might be best to wait until morning, if possible). Check for signs of stress in your pet.
  • For cats, signs of stress include running away, soiling the house, hiding away and refusing to eat.
  • For dogs, signs of stress include barking a lot, running away, soiling the house, hiding and cowering, clinging to owners, whimpering, trembling and shaking, pacing and panting, and refusing to eat.
  • If your pet is stressed, keep him indoors overnight. Keep a litter tray somewhere in the house, or walk a dog after the fireworks but don’t let him off his harness and be sure to stay with him the whole time.
  1. Do a yard sweep before letting your pets back outside. Collect any sparklers, firecrackers, etc., as well as party items and broken objects. This will prevent your pet from being injured by unfamiliar objects.

For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Dehydration in Dogs

Dog drinking
Dehydration is a lack of water in the body, and can cause serious complications for pets and people alike. Water is essential to all living beings, including dogs, who depend on proper daily fluid intake to maintain appropriate health. It makes up 80 percent of your dog’s body, and dissolves natural and unnatural substances as well as serves as the root of all his biological processes, including circulation, digestion and waste removal.

What Causes Dehydration in Dogs?

Dehydration occurs when fluid levels drop to less than normal. This is due to either reduced water intake or increased fluid loss. Fluid loss can be due to overheating in hot weather or a bout of vomiting or diarrhea, especially in puppies.

What Are the General Symptoms of Dehydration in Dogs?

  • Sunken eyes
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dry mouth
  • Depression

What Should I Do If I Think My Dog Is Dehydrated?

Dehydration may indicate a serious underlying problem. If you suspect that your dog is dehydrated, take him to a Lange Animal Clinic veterinarian immediately. You may be able to detect dehydration at home by gently lifting the skin on the back of your dog’s neck or between the shoulder blades—unless your dog is seriously overweight or very shin, it should immediately return to a normal position. If he is lacking in fluids, the lifted skin may not quickly return to normal. Often, however, the signs of dehydration are not obvious, and only a veterinarian can provide proper diagnosis and treatment.

Are Certain Dogs Prone to Dehydration?

Dogs most at risk for dehydration are those who suffer from various illnesses such as kidney disorders, cancer and infectious disease. Elderly dogs and pregnant or nursing dogs may be prone to dehydration, as well as diabetic dogs whose condition is not regularly monitored.

How Is Dehydration Treated?

One of our veterinarians will administer intravenous or subcutaneous fluids, and run additional tests, if necessary, to determine the underlying cause of the condition.

How Can I Prevent Dehydration?

  • Provide clean water at all times, and change it frequently to ensure freshness. Also, don’t forget to wash your pet’s water bowl every day to prevent bacteria from forming.
  • Monitor your dog’s water intake. Generally, a dog needs at least one ounce of water for each pound of body weight per day. If your dog is not drinking an adequate amount of water, seek veterinary advice. Monitoring water intake is especially important if he’s recovering from diarrhea, vomiting or other illnesses.
  • Purchase a water bowl with a weighted bottom to prevent your dog from knocking it over.
  • Bring extra water when you’re traveling or exercising with your dog.
  • If you notice your pet is drinking less than usual, check his mouth for sores or other foreign objects, such as burrs or sticks.
  • Avoid chaining a dog outside, since he may get tangled up, preventing him from accessing his water bowl.
  • Keep your toilet lid closed to interrupt your dog’s efforts to turn the bowl, which can be a source of bacteria, into a water fountain.

    For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

    Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

    About Us 
    Our Services
    Setup an Appointment

Traveling With Your Dog or Cat

Cat n dog travel2

When considering interstate or international travel for your dog or cat, plan ahead because some preparations may need to start six months or more in advance.  Below are some valuable resources for when travelling domestically and internationally with your pets.  Additionally, we provide great safety tips for when travelling with your pets by car.

1).  Schedule an appointment with a Lange Animal Clinic veterinarian for your pet’s exam

Animals should be healthy enough to travel, and depending on the regulations of your destination, there may be additional animal health prerequisites, such as identification, vaccinations, tests, certifications, etc.

2).  Share information with one of our Veterinarians

The destination authorities (consulate or embassy of the country, state or territory animal health department, etc.) may have sent you specific information or forms that need to be shared with or signed by one of our veterinarians.  A Lange Animal Clinic veterinarian may need to make copies of the materials to assist in the CVI process or for recordkeeping purposes

3).  Know the requirements and restrictions for transporting dogs and cats

Countries, territories, states, and even public modes of transportation have requirements and restrictions on transporting animals. The regulations help protect people, animals, and ecosystems by guarding against the spread of dangerous diseases, pests, and invasive and injurious animals. Most likely, a certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI) will be required by the authorities at destination. It is your responsibility to get this information from the authorities of your destination well in advance of travel so that you can plan accordingly, including considering alternatives to transporting the animal(s).

Be aware that some countries and states may require your pet to be placed in quarantined upon arrival (e.g., according to Hawaii’s law for dogs and cats, quarantine may be up to 120 days).

The chart below will help you find the rules and regulations that impact you and your pet. In addition, the International Pet and Animal Transportation Association may be able to assist you with your pet’s international travel.

​​What type of travel? Where to find requirements and restrictions?
​By public air, rail, bus, or boat ​Check with the carrier line that you will be using. Special rules may apply to dogs that qualify under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as service animals.
​Interstate (travel across state or territory borders within the U.S.) ​Find the requirements of your destination location and the contact information of the animal health authority on the USDA’s webpage, State Regulations for Importing Animals.
​International travel from the U.S. (exporting) ​Contact the consulate or embassy of the country of destination or the country’s animal health authority for information on the importation requirements.

AND

Check the USDA’s Animal and Animal Product Export Information, including if an import permit is required and if a designated port needs to be used.

​International travel into the U.S. (importing) ​The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)has regulations on the importation of dogs and cats into the U.S.

AND

The USDA also has certain import restrictions on dogs, and a two page factsheet on importing live dogs is available for free download.

AND

Check for the import requirements for the state of destination on the USDA’s webpage, State Regulations for Importing Animals.

Also, here are some great resources from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA):

Here are some safety tips when travelling in the car with your furry ones:

Dogs shouldn’t roam in the car

The safest way for your dog to travel in the car is in a crate that has been anchored to the vehicle using a seatbelt or other secure means. Dog restraints or seat belts are useful for preventing your dog from roaming around the car and being a distraction to the driver, but they haven’t been reliably shown to protect dogs during a crash.

Cats belong in carriers

Most cats aren’t comfortable traveling in cars, so for their safety as well as yours, keep them in a carrier. It’s important to restrain these carriers in the car so that they don’t bounce around and hurt your cat. Do this by securing a seat belt around the front of the carrier.

Leave the front seat for humans

Keep your pet in the back seat of the car. If an airbag deploys while your pet is in the passenger seat (even in a crate), it might injure your pet.

Keep those heads inside!

Dogs and cats should always be kept safely inside the car. Pets who are allowed to stick their heads out the window can be injured by particles of debris or made sick by having cold air forced into their lungs. Never transport a pet in the back of an open pickup truck.

Give your pet plenty of rest stops

Stop frequently to allow your pet to exercise and eliminate. But never permit your pet to leave the car without a collar, ID tag and leash.

Bring along a human buddy

Whenever possible, share the driving and pet caretaking duties with a friend or family member. You’ll be able to get food or use the facilities at rest stops knowing that someone you trust is keeping a close eye on your pets.

Don’t ever leave your pet alone in a car

A quick pit stop may feel like no time at all to you, but it’s too long to leave your pet in a car by himself. One hazard is heat: When it’s 72 degrees Fahrenheit outside, the temperature inside your car can heat up to 116 degrees within an hour. On an 85-degree day, even with the windows slightly open, the temperature inside your car can reach 102 degrees in just 10 minutes. If you’re held up for 30 minutes, you may return to a car that’s 120 degrees inside and a pet who is suffering irreversible organ damage or death.

For more information about travelling with your pets or for help answering any additional questions that you may have, please contact a Lange Animal Clinic veterinarian.


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Setup an Appointment

Debunking Myths of Leaving Your Dog Unattended in Your Car

Dog-In-Car

Sadly there are still many erroneous misconceptions out there surrounding the idea of leaving pets in parked cars. These contribute to dangerous practices that result in the heat stroke cases and deaths that Lange Animal Clinic associates are seeing on a daily basis and that we all read about in the news and online way too often.

We want to debunk these misconceptions and do our part to put a stop to these dangerous practices. Use it to educate yourself and protect your pets, and share it to help educate others. The more people we can get to recognize the inherent dangers of these misconceptions and practices, the more injuries and deaths from heat stroke in pets we can all help to prevent.

Misconception #1: “I leave the windows cracked in the car to let air in”

The Reality: Multiple studies have shown that leaving the windows cracked has only a minimal, and overall insignificant protective benefit.

Studies have shown that the average temperature rise of 3.4°F per 5 minutes in an enclosed car was only decreased to 3.1°F per 5 minutes by ‘cracking’ the windows. This equated to a difference of only 3.6°F over the 60-minute study period (40.8°F total heat rise with windows fully closed, compared to 37.2°F rise with windows ‘cracked’).

Another study showed only a 2°F difference at the end of the 90-minute study period between a fully enclosed vehicle and one with the windows ‘cracked’.

As you can see, while cracking the windows does have some effect on slowing down the temperature rise inside a car, the effect is very minimal and it’s not enough to prevent the temperature inside a car from quickly rising to deadly levels.

Bottom Line:

  • Do not leave your pets or kids alone in parked cars.
  • Cracking windows, short periods of time, relatively mild days, leaving water, or running the air conditioner do not make a parked car a safe place for a pet to be alone.
  • Educate yourself and your loved ones to protect more pets.

Misconception #2: “I’ll only be gone for a few minutes”

The Reality: Whenever you run into a store there are plenty of factors that are outside of your control and which can prolong your time away from your dog.

Consider a longer than usual check-out line, bumping into a friend or neighbor, forgetting something from your shopping list, or even a slip and fall. There really are many unforeseen things that could realistically and significantly delay your return to your car. And that delay can result in your dog suffering (and potentially dying) from heat stroke.

The next time you dart into a store for a “quick shopping trip”, time yourself. Do this exercise a few times and see how long “a few minutes” can actually be. Then keep the following numbers in mind:

19° – that’s the average °F temperature increase in a parked after just 10 minutes in one study
29° – the average °F temperature increase after just 20 minutes
34° – the average °F temperature increase after 30 minutes
43° – the average °F temperature increase after 60 minutes

Now imagine what this would equate to on a relatively mild 80°F day. Imagine what it would be on one of the 100°F days that are common in certain areas, and are becoming more commonplace in others. The results can be devastating.

Misconception #3: “It’s only 70°F out, there’s no danger of heat stroke

The Reality: Temperatures in the low 70’s are plenty hot enough to cause a dog left in a parked car to develop and suffer from heat stroke.

In fact, the study cited above was conducted in San Francisco on a series of relatively mild days. On one of the 72°F days during the study the temperature inside the test car reached 93°F in 10 minutes, 105°F in 20 minutes, 110°F in 30 minutes, and 119°F in 60 minutes! Plenty hot enough to cause heat stroke.

Not only is 70°F warm enough to result in heat stroke, even temperatures in the low 60s can be dangerous for some pets. This is because certain cats and dogs – based on factors such as breed, weight, existing medical conditions, and several other factors – are actually more sensitive to heat than others, and therefore at even greater risk of developing and suffering from heat stroke.

Misconception #4: “I always leave water in the car for my dog, so I don’t have to worry about heat stroke”

The Reality: Though leaving water is a good thing, as it can help to prevent dehydration and heat exhaustion, it does very little to stave off heat stroke in parked cars.

The reason is that dogs rely mostly on the evaporative cooling effects of panting to get rid of excess heat, and their ability to do so effectively is quickly overwhelmed in a hot, stuffy car- regardless of whether or not they have a water bowl in front of them.

Misconception #5: “I leave the air conditioner running, so I don’t have to worry about heat stroke”

The Reality: Air conditioner compressors and car engines fail, and dogs knock into and inadvertently press and hit buttons and switches.

Sadly there are plenty of cases of dogs dying when the car air conditioner failed or a dog bumped into and switched off the air conditioner.When air conditioner compressors fail, the air blowing into the car from the vents often turns from cool to hot, greatly speeding up the temperature rise within the car.

Generally speaking, it is never a good idea to leave your beloved dog in a car alone for any extended periods of time.  Please take precautions when travelling with your pets to ensure their good health and safety to avoid the possibility of heat stroke and death.


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

About Us 
Our Services
Setup an Appointment