Download the New, Free ASPCA Harmful Substances App!

We wanted to share with all of you that the ASPCA has just launched a very useful free app for smartphones and tablets which quickly and easily allows you to gather critical information on substances that may be harmful to your pet(s) based off their species!

With just a few swipes, you can:

  • Lookup, by species, substances of all sorts to determine if they may or may not be harmful to your pet(s).
  • Easily select which item you are searching for in based on their quick selection menu.
  • Gain access to colorful images for easy identification, level of toxicity, side effects, and actions to take for each item listed.
  • Complete access to their “chocolate wheel” and “rodentislide”, quickly helping you determine the level of severity for your pet if these substances are consumed.
  • Quickly contact the ASPCA 24/7/365 hotline number, with full access to their specially trained staff and toxicologists in a click of a button.

Below are some screen shots of this new free app which is available for download:

smartphone screenshots

To download the app based on your device- click on either one of these links:

DOWNLOAD NOW

Downloadicon-Apple

Downloadicon-Android


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Springtime Pet Safety and Tips

Spring Dog

Spring has sprung, and with the change of season, it’s time to start spring cleaning and allowing the fresh outside air indoors.  But the new balmy weather can prove problematic for curious pets—or their parents. Before you embark on seasonal chores or outdoor revelry, take inventory of potential springtime hazards for your furry friends. To help you out, Veterinarians at Lange Animal Clinic have come up with a few seasonal tips that will help prevent accidents or unfortunate situations.

Windows and Screens

Many pet parents welcome the breezy days of spring by opening their windows. Unfortunately, they also unknowingly put their pets at risk—especially cats, who are apt to jump or fall through unscreened windows. Be sure to install snug and sturdy screens in all of your windows. If you have adjustable screens, make sure they are tightly wedged into window frames.

Restrain in Car Rides!

While every pet owner knows dogs love to feel the wind on their furry faces, allowing them to ride in the bed of pick-up trucks or poke their heads out of moving-car windows is dangerous. Flying debris and insects can cause inner ear or eye injuries and lung infections, and abrupt stops or turns can cause major injury, or worse! Pets in cars should always be secured in a crate or wearing a seatbelt harness designed especially for them.

Spring Cleanup

Spring cleaning is a time-honored tradition in many households, but be sure to keep all cleaners and chemicals away from your pets! Almost all commercially sold cleaning products contain chemicals that are harmful to pets. The key to using them safely is to read and follow label directions for proper use and storage.

Home Improvements

Products such as paints, mineral spirits and solvents can be toxic to your pets and cause severe irritation or chemical burns. Carefully read all labels to see if the product is safe to use around your furry friends. Also, be cautious of physical hazards, including nails, staples, insulation, blades and power tools. It may be wise to confine your dog or cat to a designated pet-friendly room during home improvement projects.

Let Your Garden Grow—With Care

Pet parents, take care—fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides keep our plants and lawns healthy and green, but their ingredients aren’t meant for four-legged consumption and can be fatal if your pet ingests them.  Always store these poisonous products in out-of-the-way places and follow label instructions carefully. Check out our full list of garden care tips.

Poisonous Plants 

Time to let your garden grow! But beware, many popular springtime plants—including Easter lilies, rhododendron and azaleas—are highly toxic to pets and can easily prove fatal if eaten. Check out our full list—and pics!—of toxic and non-toxic plants for your home and garden.

Sneezing… Ah… Ah…. Achoo!

Like their sneezy human counterparts, pets can be allergic to foods, dust, plants and pollens. Allergic reactions in dogs and cats can cause minor sniffling and sneezing as well as life-threatening anaphylactic shock. If you suspect your pet has a springtime allergy, please visit a Lange Animal Clinic Veterinarian as soon as possible.

Bugs and Little Critters

April showers bring May flowers—and an onslaught of bugs! Make sure your pet is on year-round heartworm preventive medication, as well as a flea and tick control program.   Ask a Lange Animal Clinic to recommend a plan designed specifically for your pet.

Outdoor Activities

Warmer weather means more trips to the park, longer walks and more chances for your pet to wander off! Make sure your dog or cat has a microchip for identification and wears a tag imprinted with your home address, cell phone and any other relevant contact information.  Canines should wear flat (never choke!) collars, please.  Lange Animal Clinic can microchip your pet for the low cost of only $39 and it is painless and provides that added security you need.

If you suspect your pet may have come in contact with or ingested a potentially poisonous substance, contact your local veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

About Us 
Our Services
Setup an Appointment

Help Prevent and Fight Cruelty to Animals

Cruelty Dog

Lange Animal Clinic is an avid ASPCA supporter with dedicated Agents that perform great work to save the lives of animals across the country. But did you know that you, too, can help crack down on animal cruelty in your community? Read on for simple actions you can take to make the world a safer place for animals.

Here are some other signs and symptoms that we see in many of the cases the ASPCA can investigate:

  • Tick or flea infestations. Such a condition, if left untreated by a veterinarian, can lead to an animal’s death.
  • Wounds on the body.
  • Patches of missing hair.
  • Extremely thin, starving animals.
  • Limping.
  • An owner striking or otherwise physically abusing an animal.
  • Dogs who are repeatedly left alone without food and water, often chained up in a yard.
  • Dogs who have been hit by cars-or are showing any of the signs listed above-and have not been taken to a veterinarian.
  • Dogs who are kept outside without shelter in extreme weather conditions.
  • Animals who cower in fear or act aggressively when approached by their owners.

Steps you can take

  1. Know who to call to report animal cruelty. Every state and every town are different. In some areas, you may have to rely on the police department to investigate animal cruelty; in others, you may have to contact local animal control or another municipal agency. If you aren’t sure where to report cruelty, please visit the ASPCA Report Animal Cruelty section.
  2. Get to know and look out for the animals in your neighborhood. By being aware, you’re more likely to notice, for example, that the dog next door who was once hefty has lost weight rapidly—a possible indicator of abuse.
  3. Make the call. Without phone calls from concerned citizens who report cruelty in their neighborhoods, we wouldn’t know about most instances of animal abuse. It all comes from the public, it all starts with YOU—that’s why it’s so important to keep your eyes and ears open.
  4. Provide as much as information as possible when reporting animal cruelty. The details that you provide can go a long way toward assisting an investigating officer. It helps to write down the type of cruelty you witnessed, who was involved, the date of the incident and where it took place.
  5. Contact your local law enforcement department and let them know that investigating animal cruelty should be a priority. Animal cruelty is a CRIME—and the police MUST investigate these crimes.
  6. Fight for the passage of strong anti-cruelty laws on federal, state and local levels by joining the ASPCA Advocacy Brigade. With stronger laws come tougher penalties. As an ASPCA Advocacy Brigade member, you’ll receive emails asking you to write letters encouraging your legislators to pass these laws—and you can send them directly from our website.
  7. Set a good example for others. If you have pets, be sure to always show them the love and good care they deserve. But it’s more than just food, water, and adequate shelter. If you think your animal is sick, bring him to the veterinarian. Be responsible and have your animals spayed or neutered. And give your pets lots of hugs!
  8. Talk to your kids about how to treat animals with kindness and respect. We regularly see children in homes where animal abuse has been reported. If a parent isn’t treating the family’s pets right, we tell the kids that their dog or cat would really appreciate fresh water every day or some daily playtime. If the animal has been left outside without shelter, we’ll say, ‘You have a nice house, and if you get cold, you can put a coat on. But your dog can’t do that.’ Children understand that animals are living creatures who have the ability to feel pain, joy and sadness.
  9. Support your local shelter or animal rescue organization. It’s a great way to make a difference. Some of our ASPCA volunteers foster animals who have been abused in their former homes, giving these dogs and cats the chance they deserve to have a good life. You can find a list of shelters and rescue groups in your area in our National Shelter Directory.
  10. Start a Neighborhood Watch Program. Get to know the animals in your neighborhood and invite your friends and neighbors to do the same. Together you can keep an eye out for any suspicious behaviors—abuse and neglect of companion animals, the mistreatment of local wildlife, dogs left in hot cars and other signs of abuse.