Download the New, Free ASPCA Harmful Substances App!

We wanted to share with all of you that the ASPCA has just launched a very useful free app for smartphones and tablets which quickly and easily allows you to gather critical information on substances that may be harmful to your pet(s) based off their species!

With just a few swipes, you can:

  • Lookup, by species, substances of all sorts to determine if they may or may not be harmful to your pet(s).
  • Easily select which item you are searching for in based on their quick selection menu.
  • Gain access to colorful images for easy identification, level of toxicity, side effects, and actions to take for each item listed.
  • Complete access to their “chocolate wheel” and “rodentislide”, quickly helping you determine the level of severity for your pet if these substances are consumed.
  • Quickly contact the ASPCA 24/7/365 hotline number, with full access to their specially trained staff and toxicologists in a click of a button.

Below are some screen shots of this new free app which is available for download:

smartphone screenshots

To download the app based on your device- click on either one of these links:

DOWNLOAD NOW

Downloadicon-Apple

Downloadicon-Android


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Dental Cleanings for Cats and Dogs- Importance and Benefits

Professional dental cleaning performed by a Lange Animal Clinic Veterinarian is often indicated when periodontal disease is present.  Our own teeth are scaled by a dentist or hygienist – we sit in the chair and open our mouth when requested, letting the professional do their work. While the principles of good oral hygiene and dental health are the same for dogs and cats as for people, there are some significant differences. Humans understand why the procedure is important, and we typically do not need sedation or restraint. Neither is true for our pets.

Here are some very interesting statistics and facts:

  • Eighty-five percent of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are 3 years of age.
  • Dental disease can result in bad breath, painful chewing, and tooth loss.
  • Bacteria under the gum can travel to the heart, kidneys, and liver.
  • A professional dental cleaning is required to remove plaque and tartar from a pet’s teeth and to assess the health of the mouth.
  • A thorough dental cleaning requires that the pet be under anesthesia.
  • Regular at-home dental care can help improve the health of your pet’s mouth and lengthen the intervals between professional dental cleanings.

Another important difference between human and veterinary dental practice is that we tell the dentist when there is discomfort; to ensure that nothing is missed in dogs or cats, our patients require a thorough oral examination as part of a dental scaling procedure. Additionally, bloodwork is required in advance of a dental cleaning to ensure your pet is not experiencing any other health concerns.  Occasionally, a Lange Animal Clinic Veterinarian may recommend dental radiographs as well.

Dental


Every professional dental cleaning starts with a review of the patient’s general health and any previous dental history. For a thorough, safe dental cleaning in veterinary patients, anesthesia is essential, as this permits a comprehensive assessment of the tissues, allows dental radiographs to be made when indicated, keeps the pet immobile during the process, and eliminates pain or discomfort- followed by the cleaning (scaling and polishing procedure) itself above and below the gum-line. “Non-anesthetic or Anesthesia-free dental scaling” is not recommended by American Veterinary Dental Council (AVDC).

Depending on the overall health of the teeth, there may need to be tooth extractions for those where periodontal disease have severely damaged them.  This process is performed during the cleaning and we do our best to communicate this to our clients in advance of the dental cleaning procedure.  However, once we are actually able to get under the gum line we may, from time to time, discover the roots of a tooth is damaged to the point it should be removed.

Overall, dental cleaning for dogs and cats is a very important treatment that should be performed.  Your pet will feel better afterwards and the quality of life will be improved.


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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Congratulations to Our Winner in Our April Raffle Drawing!

April Raffle Winner

CONGRATULATIONS DENISE!

Denise Maneno and her eight cats: Cricket, Mango, Miss Kitty, Sadie, Schmitty, Skeeter, Stormie, and Sugar were the winners in our April raffle drawing of $50 worth of Flea & Tick Preventative!

We will have another raffle contest for the month of May so be sure to fill out your ticket for a chance to win if you are visiting us this month!

Ten Most Common Pet Toxins of 2014

toxic foods

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL handled more than 167,000 calls involving pets exposed to possibly poisonous substances in 2014. Nearly 16% of those calls were from pet parents whose pets got into medicines intended for human use, putting this category at the top of the toxin list for the seventh year in a row.

Here are the 10 most common pet toxins of 2014 ranked in order of call volume:

  • Human prescription medications are most often exposed to pets, as mentioned above. The prescriptions that caused the most concern correlated with the most popular medications prescribed to humans.
  • Over-the-counter medications, including herbal and other natural supplements, attracted greater concern this year than in previous years resulting in approximately 25,000 calls. This category is exceptionally large, encompassing more than 6,900 different products.
  • Insecticides dropped to the third slot this year, comprising 9.1% of calls to the APCC (15,000 cases). These products can be very dangerous, especially if the label directions are not followed.
  • Household items were the cause for concern in more than 13,500 cases, especially paints and cleaning products.
  • Human foods are appealing to pets, especially dogs. Dogs can get into serious trouble by ingesting onions, garlic, grapes, raisins and xylitol, a sugar substitute which can be life-threatening for animals. Approximately 13,200 cases involved human foods in 2014.
  • Veterinary medications made up 7% of total cases in 2014. Pet parents should be aware that chewable medications are very tasty and pets might ingest an entire bottle if it is not kept out of their reach.
  • Chocolate ingestion is very common. At the APCC, chocolate calls make up 6% of the total call volume—more than 30 calls a day! The darker the chocolate, the more potential it has to do harm.
  • Plants represent approximately 5% of the calls to the APCC and moved up a spot since 2014. Most of these calls involve cats and houseplants.
  • Rodenticides are made to kill mice and rats, but they can also kill pets if ingested. APCC handled more than 7,500 calls about rodenticides last year.
  • Lawn and garden products round out the top ten, accounting for about 2.7% of all calls. Many of these exposures occurred because people did not store lawn and garden products out of the reach of pets.

If you have any reason to suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please contact a Lange Animal Clinic veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

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FDA Warns Popular Topical Pain Medication Toxic to Pets

Fernpelt

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an official warning that topical pain medications containing flurbiprofen are dangerous to animals, even in tiny amounts. The warning was the result of several reports of household pets becoming ill or dying after the guardians used flurbiprofen topical pain relief formulations.

Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat arthritis, joint pain, muscular discomfort and other aches. It was originally marketed as Ansaid® (Pfizer), then Froben® (Abbott), and is now widely available in generic form. It is similar to ibuprofen (Motrin® or Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), and other NSAIDs. Flurbiprofen is commonly added to pain relieving creams and lotions, and that may be how pets, especially cats, are being accidentally poisoned.

Pets and medications

Cats seem particularly sensitive to NSAIDs such as flurbiprofen. For years veterinarians have warned cat owners to avoid Tylenol (acetaminophen) and never give your dog or cat aspirin, ibuprofen, or other NSAIDs without consulting with your veterinarian first. Add flurbiprofen to that No-Try List.

What prompted this warning?

The FDA revealed that the guardian of two cats sickened by flurbiprofen had recently used a pain-relieving cream on the neck and feet. The guardian did not recall the two cats eating, licking or otherwise directly contacting the cream. These two cats developed kidney failure and fortunately recovered with veterinary care.

Another household had three cats that became sick and died, despite aggressive veterinary care. The guardian had also used a flurbiprofen-containing product prior to the cats developing clinical signs. All three cats eventually died and had necropsies performed, confirming NSAID toxicity.

Clinical signs of flurbiprofen and NSAID toxicity are severe and abrupt. Many cats will progress to critical condition within 24 to 72 hours of NSAID exposure. Dogs may also be affected by flurbiprofen and NSAIDs, although they appear to be less sensitive to developing life-threatening toxicity.

What are the signs of NSAID poisoning?

Clinical Signs of Flurbiprofen and NSAID Toxicity in Cats and Dogs include:

  • Decreased appetite and reluctance to eat
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Blood in stool
  • Melena (black, tarry stools)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Anemia
  • Increased thirst or urination

How can you protect your pet?

Lange Animal Clinic veterinarians in Pekin, IL urge the that if you use a topical pain relief product, it’s critical to keep these medications away from your dog or cat. If you apply a topical cream or lotion, avoid touching your pet for several hours and only after thoroughly washing. Be careful contacting couches, chairs and bedding with these preparations. Curious cats and dogs may lick residues and become poisoned. Cats may be affected by tiny amounts of flurbiprofen and there may be risk of continued exposure to tiny amounts over several days or weeks.

Our veterinarians have been seeing an increase in inadvertent poisonings from topical medications over the past several years. Hormone and testosterone gels, cancer medications, nicotine patches, topical steroids and pain treatments have all been reported to cause accidental toxicity in pets. This latest FDA warning reminds us that as we seek convenience and relief for ourselves, there may be unintended consequences for our pets. Treat your pain, but remember even our most seemingly safe medications may be deadly to our furry family members.


For over 45 years, Lange Animal Clinic has provided veterinary services in Pekin, IL and the surrounding areas for over three family generations. Our expert staff of Veterinarians, Veterinary Technicians, and Veterinary Assistants are trained to ensure the best quality medical care for your beloved pets-whether it be as a routine medical examination to more complicated surgical procedures. We are a small companion animal clinic providing services for dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

Dr. Colleen O’Rourke, owner and senior Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, takes great pride in making certain that every patient’s experience is handled with the utmost care, compassion, and economically in the best interests of our clients. Visit us at www.langeanimal.com.  

About Us 
Our Services
Setup an Appointment